BCM & DR: Plans That Can’t Be Made!

In many organizations, executives and employees – and even auditors, will ask Business Continuity Management (BCM) / Disaster Recovery (DR) practitioners if they have plans for every situation possible; every potential risk and every potential impact to the organization. Considering that the number of risks that exist in the world today is basically infinite – once you calculate all the various potential impacts to an organization from a single event – there will be communication, restoration and recovery plans that just can’t be developed, documented, implemented, communicated, validated or maintained. It is impossible to have a response to every situation; the secret it to be able to adapt to the situation and leverage the response plans you do have to help adapt to the disaster situation.
Still, the questions will come about these plans and why a response isn’t captured for a particular situation and its resulting scenarios. A BCM/DR practitioner must be able to address these questions and be able to respond with reasons as to why specific plans don’t – and can’t – exist.
There are a few key reasons that practitioners must be able to communicate to those asking the questions and they are noted below.

1. Unknown Unknowns – In any situation – both disaster related and non-disaster related, will contain all sorts of details. One specific activity or item can have multiple responses depending on the details that come from the situation itself. For example, an earthquake can cause minor or major damage to an area but depending on where it occurs and when it occurs, the responses to the earthquake will be completely different.

2. Highly Improbably – Sometimes a risk to an organization is just so improbably that creating a plan for the situation would be futile and a waste of resources (time and people). For example, an organization with a facility in the middle of the Canadian prairies wouldn’t bother creating a disaster response plan to avalanches; it’s just so highly unlikely that it could ever happen. If an organization documents the probably risks – such as floods or snowstorms for that previously mentioned prairie location – it can adapt the plans that address the likely risks to those that are highly unlikely. New plans for unlikely activities would just distract from developing plans and processes that are really needed.

3. Changes in Assumptions – Assumptions are those things we believe to be true and they should be challenged continuously; especially through tests and exercises. However, if they aren’t challenged at some point then the continued planning and BCM/DR program development could be based on false information. For instance, if specific partners are expected to perform specific tasks for your organization when it experiences a disaster but they don’t know about them – or the tasks have changed and they’ve not been notified – your plans are going to out of sync with expectations and need. Plans are not build on assumptions but the detailed activities contained with them will be built by assumptions and they must be reviewed at all times.

4. Public Opinion / Perception – Public opinion can change with no warning; what the public may agree to in one situation they may not agree with in another situation- even when the details are relatively the same. All an organization can do is ensure it has a comprehensive Crisis Management and Communications Plan (CM&C) and those responsible for the plan understand how to communicate with the public and respond to the public. There is no way and organization can guess at what the public may believe and trying to determine every response plan to unknown perceptions would take eons to develop – something that an organization just can’t do.

5. External Directives – Depending on the scale of the situation, an organization may receive instructions from 3rd parties, such as the police or local governments. It’s never known what these groups may dictate to an organization, as it’s never known ahead of time what or when a disaster will occur. Thus, a plan can’t be developed to address the specifics of what to do based on directives received from external sources. However, if an organization has an established BCM/DR program with relevant plans and processes, it can adapt itself to the situation based on the impact to the organization itself. If an external source dictates a directive then the organization can take what it has in place and adapt itself. But a plan specific to communications that haven’t been provided – because a disaster hasn’t occurred yet – can’t be documented.

© StoneRoad 2014
A.Alex Fullick has over 17 years experience working in Business Continuity and is the author of numerous books, including “Heads in the Sand” and “BIA: Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program.”

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