BUSINESS CONTINUITY & DISASTER PLANNING BOOKS BY ALEX FULLICK: eBOOKS / KINDLE VERSIONS NOW AVAILABLE!!

We are happy to announce that ebook / Kindle versions of all books by StoneRoad founder A.Alex Fullick, are now available from Amazon.com (and other Global Amazon sites).

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We hope these information sources help you with your Business Continuity / Disaster Recovery Program efforts. Keep your eyes open for more BCM / DR information sources coming from A.Alex Fullick and StoneRoad.

Happy planning!

 

Regards,

The StoneRoad Team.

PS: Congrats boss!  ;)

© StoneRoad 2015

A.Alex Fullick has over 18 years’ experience working in Business Continuity and is the author of numerous books, including “Heads in the Sand” and “BIA: Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program.”

 

BC & DR Plans: Don’t Worry About the Fluff

So when was the last time you found what you wanted in a document without having to dig through pages and pages of information? Do you find that so much of what is in the document doesn’t really need to be there? Is it irrelevant? Is it fluff material just so the volume of the document looks good? In many cases it turns out the document is basically built on the foundation of quantity over quality. That means most of the document – the stuff yo don’t need – is just fluff. Continue reading

BCM & DR: Learn From What Goes Right, As Well As What Goes Wrong

So things didn’t go as well as you planned; either your project implementation didn’t go the way you wanted – without any hiccups – or your organization didn’t respond the way you’d expected them to when the proverbial hit the fan. Well, get used to it. That’s the way things go. You always plan for the worst and hope for the best and having a project management background as well as my BCM/DR background, things don’t always go as planned no matter how hard you try. However, if something does go wrong, it’s a good idea to learn from it. Continue reading

BCM / DR Programs: Executive Buy-In Doesn’t Always Mean Support

First of all, apologies for the delay in posting something new; I’ve been enjoying the beaches of Australia and New Zealand for 3.5 weeks. :)  Anyway, to the blog for today…

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Well, it’s time to work on the Business Continuity Management (BCM) / Disaster Recovery (DR) program based on the maintenance schedule. You’ve got your plan all well laid out and people know it’s coming and are ready to participate…sometimes begrudgingly. Yet, for some reason your well-thought out plan isn’t going to plan at all. Continue reading

Business Impact Analysis (BIA): It’s Never Right the First Time!!

If you’ve been working in the Business Continuity Management (BCM) or Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP) industry for some time you’ve probably been through a Business Impact Analysis (BIA) project; either from the very first initiation or through a maintenance phase. And if you’re honest with yourself, it probably didn’t go as well as you would have liked. Continue reading

We’re pleased to announce the new book by StoneRoad founder, A. Alex Fullick, is now available: “Testing Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity Plans: How to Plan and Execute Successful Tests”.  It comes on the heals of his successful book “Business Impact Analysis”. Like all of Mr. Fullick’s books, they are all based on real-world hands-on experiences taken from nearly 20 years in the BCM/DR industry.  Get your copy at amazon.com  or at our own shop on stone-road.com. Read the full press release below! Regards, The StoneRoad Team ************************************************** Continue reading

BCM / DR: A Single Solution for Everyone?

What if there was only a single BCM/DR methodology that all organizations would follow? Would it be able to address the specific concerns of particular industries or generalize to the point where it adds no value? Would it be able to address all situations, all possible scenarios and all industries in all countries? How could any single methodology address every situation and every minute detail; taking into account language interpretation, definitions and culture? Could it be done?

If everything was the same and the same perspectives were leveraged it would make sense for what satisfies the needs of a manufacturer to use the same rationale that suits an insurance company. But that is impossible isn’t it? There are other concerns for a manufacturer has that an insurance company wouldn’t. That’s like saying what is good for one person is good for another. Well, we know that’s not correct because we are all individuals with our own wants, needs, desires…and dislikes. Continue reading