One Month Away for the Premier of “Preparing for the Unexpected”

Well, we are now only one month away from the premiere of the new internet radio show hosted by StoneRoad founder Alex Fullick.  Continue reading

BCM & DR: People Over Profit

There is an old adage that ‘you can’t put a price on life’ and I personally believe that. No amount of money will every replace a lost life due to a disaster or any other situation. After I recently heard a response to so some questions about Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery by a Senior Executive, I’m beginning to think that some organizations actually do put a dollar value on life – even if they don’t know they’re doing. Continue reading

BUSINESS CONTINUITY & DISASTER PLANNING BOOKS BY ALEX FULLICK: eBOOKS / KINDLE VERSIONS NOW AVAILABLE!!

We are happy to announce that ebook / Kindle versions of all books by StoneRoad founder A.Alex Fullick, are now available from Amazon.com (and other Global Amazon sites).

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We hope these information sources help you with your Business Continuity / Disaster Recovery Program efforts. Keep your eyes open for more BCM / DR information sources coming from A.Alex Fullick and StoneRoad.

Happy planning!

 

Regards,

The StoneRoad Team.

PS: Congrats boss!  😉

© StoneRoad 2015

A.Alex Fullick has over 18 years’ experience working in Business Continuity and is the author of numerous books, including “Heads in the Sand” and “BIA: Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program.”

 

BCM & DR: Learn From What Goes Right, As Well As What Goes Wrong

So things didn’t go as well as you planned; either your project implementation didn’t go the way you wanted – without any hiccups – or your organization didn’t respond the way you’d expected them to when the proverbial hit the fan. Well, get used to it. That’s the way things go. You always plan for the worst and hope for the best and having a project management background as well as my BCM/DR background, things don’t always go as planned no matter how hard you try. However, if something does go wrong, it’s a good idea to learn from it. Continue reading

BCM & DR Communications: Telling Only Half the Story.

This last week has been quite the week for pedestrian and vehicle collisions and accidents. We even had a few people die this week due to such incidents. Yes, I feel for the friends and families of those that have been impacted yet, what struck me most about each situation, was the communication messages being conveyed.

IT’s easy to blame one side of the situation and in many cases that might be reality. But just like in BCM and DR, we must convey a message that everyone can understand. The communications have to be straight to it and yet be articulate enough for people of any walk of life to understand the message – and have it retained. They can’t just be to one side of the situation. Here’s what I mean.

Immediately after the first accident the police and responding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel were placing the blame for the traffic incidents on the shoulders of those driving; there was no responsibility placed on the side of the pedestrian. I found this odd because it was clean in some of the situations that the pedestrian wasn’t following the rules set out for them and the reminder about the rules wasn’t coming from the police of EMS; it was only directed at the vehicle operators. Continue reading

Ebola Protection Not as Good as They Say!

Well, it doesn’t see like I’ll be quiet about the Ebola virus anytime soon. If you’ve been paying attention to the news you’ll see that Spain has had a few cases and has recently had a nurse test positive for the disease and she was wearing protective clothing. So, is what we have in place good enough? Do the ‘people that know’ actually know how to stop and confine the disease from spreading if the care workers are still catching it? Continue reading

BCP/ IT DRP Plans: Never Consider Them Complete

All organizations with a Business Continuity Management (BCM) or Disaster Recovery (DR) program always strive to have their Business Continuity Plans (BCP) / Disaster Recovery Plans (DRP) in a state they can use: in a state they believe will cover them in any and all situations. They want their plans to at least cover the basic minimum so that they can be responsive to any situation. But if an organization takes its program – and related plans – seriously, then these plans are never fully complete.
For a plan to be truly viable and robust, it must be able to address as many possible situations as possible while at the same time must have the flexible enough to adapt to any potential unknown situations. If it’s ‘carved in stone’ it makes a bit tough to adapt the plan to the situation (the situation won’t adapt to your plan).
This flexibility – and it’s maintenance (which keeps the plan alive) – includes incorporating lessons learned captured from news headlines and then incorporating the potential new activities or considerations that may not be in the current BCM / DRP plan. These plans aren’t quick fixes or static responses to disasters; they are ‘living and breathing’ documents that need new information to grow and become robust. This is why they should never be considered as complete; as the organization grows and changes – and the circumstances surrounding the organization changes – so to must the BCM and DRP plans.
It’s like trying to pin a cloud to the sky; it can’t be done. A BCP / DRP plan can’t stand still; it must be flexible, adaptable and continue to grow.
Risk profiles and risk triggers will continue to change as the organization develops and implements its strategic and tactical goals and objectives – the BCM program and plans must be able to follow along to assist in ensuring the organization can respond to a situation that might take them off their strategic path. A good plan or program is not a destination, it’s really a desired state of being where plans and processes are nurtured to grow and expand – it’s not a plateau you reach and then stop.
So if you want the best BCP / DRP plans to address as many situations and scenarios as possible when your organization is hit by a disaster, understand that to ensure they do just that, don’t ever consider the plans complete. Think of them as an entity that needs to grow and needs attention, otherwise when you need your plans, they won’t be able to help you because they’d reflect contingencies and strategies that represent the company when the plan was first developed – which could be years earlier.

© StoneRoad 2014
A.Alex Fullick has over 17 years experience working in Business Continuity and is the author of numerous books, including “Heads in the Sand” and “BIA: Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program.”

Regards,

A.Alex Fullick, MBCI, CBCP, CBRA, v3ITIL | Director, Stone Road Inc. | 1-416-830-4632 | alex@stone-road.com

“Failure isn’t about falling down, failure is staying down…” – Marillion