Preparing for the Unexpected – Episode 2017-12-28: Fire Services

Our 2017-12-28 episode will focus on Fire Protection and Fire Services and we’ll be joined by Tony Sabatini is the Chief Fire Protection Officer for the City of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/104167/encore-bcm-nd-dr-fire-protection-and-fire-services

Enjoy!

The StoneRoad Team

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Preparing for the Unexpected – 2018-02-01: Issue Management w/ Glen Duff

Our 2018-02-01 show is a key one; talking about Issues Management and how we can utilize it in our BCM/DR programs proactively before a disaster / business interruption and how to better manage our responses to disasters. We speak with Glen Duff (ret), who specialised in Issues Management for many years for some very large organizations.

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/103854/bcm-and-dr-issues-management

Enjoy!

The StoneRoad Team

Preparing for the Unexpected – 2017-12-14 Episode: BCM at EMUD

The 2017-12-14 Episode will focus on BCM at the East By Municipal Utility District (EMUD) and how it maintains it program to ensure the continued delivery of services to it over 1.3 million customers.

Join us, as we speak with Julia Halsne and Nelsy Rodriquez of EMUD about their BCM program

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/103252/business-continuity-at-east-bay-municipal-utility-district

Regards,

The StoneRoad Team

“Preparing for the Unexpected” – Nov 16/17 Episode: Making Org’s Resilient with Agility Recovery

Creating a resilient organization is something many organization strive for but many fall short in their goals. This week we’ll speak with Scott Teel from Agility Recovery who’ll provide some great insight on what Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planners need to consider – and do – when turning their organization into a resilient organization. Continue reading

BCM & DR: Managing Expectations

I’ve sat through many meetings between IT and Business Unit (BU) representatives where people assume they know what the other wants or is trying to say; constantly interrupting and providing their own commentary before the other finishes theirs.  Has this ever happened to you and were you the interrupter or the interrupted?  Maybe both depending on the meeting.  It got me thinking that there is often a big gap between what the Business Unit needs (or wants) with that of current technology capability…or understanding. Continue reading

BCM / DR: A Single Solution for Everyone?

What if there was only a single BCM/DR methodology that all organizations would follow? Would it be able to address the specific concerns of particular industries or generalize to the point where it adds no value? Would it be able to address all situations, all possible scenarios and all industries in all countries? How could any single methodology address every situation and every minute detail; taking into account language interpretation, definitions and culture? Could it be done?

If everything was the same and the same perspectives were leveraged it would make sense for what satisfies the needs of a manufacturer to use the same rationale that suits an insurance company. But that is impossible isn’t it? There are other concerns for a manufacturer has that an insurance company wouldn’t. That’s like saying what is good for one person is good for another. Well, we know that’s not correct because we are all individuals with our own wants, needs, desires…and dislikes. Continue reading

BCM & DR: Can Organizations be Resilient?

There’s allot of talk of organization’s becoming resilient and how they need to be resilient if they are to compete successfully and respond accordingly to the ever increasing disasters of the world – both man-made and natural in causation. But that begs the question: Can organizations be resilient? In this practitioner’s opinion, yes, they can though it takes more than a single aspect to become resilient.

Many would have you believe that you can buy resiliency off a shelf; a service or product purchased from a firm touting that they can make your organization resilient, as though the procurement of a ‘product’ will make an organization resilient. Well, unless they are a pseudo-psychologist or have a background in leadership psychology, they can’t; at least not completely. Sure, it’s fine to say that Business Continuity Plans (BCP) and Technology Recovery Plans (TRP) et al will make an organization resilient but that’s just not the complete picture. It’s only part of the overall picture.

It’s just not a simple concept – though it would be great it if was. What will make an organization resilient? Is there some sort of magic ingredient that will suddenly ensure that an organization will bounce back from any adverse situation? Well, yes and no. It’s not one single ingredient, it’s multiple ingredients that when combined just so, will help any organization get through difficult situations.

The following sections outline some areas that must be considered as part of the overall resiliency plan if an organization is to become resilient. See which one’s fit within your organization and which items you might want to focus on to improve or instil a sense of resiliency.

1 – Previous Adverse Experiences
Resilient by definition means ‘bouncing back from adversity’ so no one can be resilient if there hasn’t been previous adverse situations that the person / organization hasn’t bounced back from. How is an organization resilient if it’s never had an adverse experience? How can you measure resiliency? What are you measuring against? What has it bounced back from to prove it became resilient? It can’t be because it’s wouldn’t have anything to bounce back from, so how could it ever know it was resilient? It can’t. Of course, some would say that because the organization didn’t suffer badly during a disaster, it was resilient. Well, maybe it really wasn’t a disaster or major crisis, just a well-timed and coordinated response; that doesn’t automatically equate to being resilient.

2 – Plans/Process
It would be ridiculous to suggest that BCPs and TRPs etc don’t help make an organization resilient; of course they do. These are what get opened up and followed (or used as a guide) when the ‘real’ situation occurs. Through consistent validation and testing, amendments are made and they become more and more robust over time; able to deal with a myriad of situations. If the plans are living, validated and leveraged, then the plans will help the organization become resilient. Not just from providing point by point activities but because the validation and the testing that goes on behind them helps instil a sense of accomplishment and progression to those who use them.

3 – Technology
You can set technology functions up in a way that keeps it going even when the power goes out; even when a primary server (or other component) goes down and data/communications are redirected. You can keep the ‘green lights’ on in many ways (too many for this small article). The technology component is the single most discussed area of resiliency, to the point where many organizations believe they are resilient simply if they have a strong technology recovery or IT disaster plan in place. Well, we know that IT is only part of the overall picture.

4 – Leadership
Leaders are usually leaders because they are resilient as a person, not because they have a high profile title behind their name. They have fought there way through the ranks, overcoming obstacles and thought their way through many complex challenges, all so they can be the leader – or a leader – of an organization; a reward for hard work and perseverance. A good leader will give back to the organization and help train others within the organization how to better focus energies and deal with adverse situations.

5 – Culture
Who creates the culture? Leaders, create it. If the aspects noted in #4 are true, then the corporate culture will eventually sway in that direction, even when those that oppose the leader find they have to deal with the new way of doing things or decide to leave for other pastures. We all know what flows downhill when theirs a problem, but if a good leader really is a good leader, then the good also flows downhill. This positive aspect will help

6 – People
People. People are the most important component of resiliency. Without resilient minded people, no organization will ever truly be resilient. Its people that bounce back from adversity and as the old English adage states, ‘Carry On.’ From the org’s leadership right down to the newest person walking through the door. They all must work together to support each other; from the top down to the bottom up. Everyone has something offer in an organization and everyone has a role to play when a disaster occurs.

When all these aspects are combined, then and only then, will an organization have the chance to become resilient. Then, an organization must encounter a situation that tests all these components and that’s when an organization can determine if it’s resilient or not. Once an organization has bounced back and can stand in front of its clients, customers, partners and the general public stating that it has weathered the storm with its reputation intact, that’s when it becomes resilient; not when it buys a product or service off a shelf.

© StoneRoad 2014 (A.Alex Fullick)