NEW BCM / DR TEMPLATES! Now Available at Stone-Road.com

We’re happy to announce that we now have updated Business Continuity Management (BCM) document templates available at http://www.stone-road.com.  We’ve removed the older 2003 versions, and now have everything in a 2010 version.

Here’s what you can find: Continue reading

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BUSINESS CONTINUITY & DISASTER PLANNING BOOKS BY ALEX FULLICK: eBOOKS / KINDLE VERSIONS NOW AVAILABLE!!

We are happy to announce that ebook / Kindle versions of all books by StoneRoad founder A.Alex Fullick, are now available from Amazon.com (and other Global Amazon sites).

Testing Disaster Recovery-COVER_Layout 1 Made Again-COVER:Layout 1 Made Again VOLUME 2-COVER:Layout 1 Heads in the Sand-COVER:Layout 1 Business Impact-COVER_Layout 1

We hope these information sources help you with your Business Continuity / Disaster Recovery Program efforts. Keep your eyes open for more BCM / DR information sources coming from A.Alex Fullick and StoneRoad.

Happy planning!

 

Regards,

The StoneRoad Team.

PS: Congrats boss!  😉

© StoneRoad 2015

A.Alex Fullick has over 18 years’ experience working in Business Continuity and is the author of numerous books, including “Heads in the Sand” and “BIA: Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program.”

 

BCP/ IT DRP Plans: Never Consider Them Complete

All organizations with a Business Continuity Management (BCM) or Disaster Recovery (DR) program always strive to have their Business Continuity Plans (BCP) / Disaster Recovery Plans (DRP) in a state they can use: in a state they believe will cover them in any and all situations. They want their plans to at least cover the basic minimum so that they can be responsive to any situation. But if an organization takes its program – and related plans – seriously, then these plans are never fully complete.
For a plan to be truly viable and robust, it must be able to address as many possible situations as possible while at the same time must have the flexible enough to adapt to any potential unknown situations. If it’s ‘carved in stone’ it makes a bit tough to adapt the plan to the situation (the situation won’t adapt to your plan).
This flexibility – and it’s maintenance (which keeps the plan alive) – includes incorporating lessons learned captured from news headlines and then incorporating the potential new activities or considerations that may not be in the current BCM / DRP plan. These plans aren’t quick fixes or static responses to disasters; they are ‘living and breathing’ documents that need new information to grow and become robust. This is why they should never be considered as complete; as the organization grows and changes – and the circumstances surrounding the organization changes – so to must the BCM and DRP plans.
It’s like trying to pin a cloud to the sky; it can’t be done. A BCP / DRP plan can’t stand still; it must be flexible, adaptable and continue to grow.
Risk profiles and risk triggers will continue to change as the organization develops and implements its strategic and tactical goals and objectives – the BCM program and plans must be able to follow along to assist in ensuring the organization can respond to a situation that might take them off their strategic path. A good plan or program is not a destination, it’s really a desired state of being where plans and processes are nurtured to grow and expand – it’s not a plateau you reach and then stop.
So if you want the best BCP / DRP plans to address as many situations and scenarios as possible when your organization is hit by a disaster, understand that to ensure they do just that, don’t ever consider the plans complete. Think of them as an entity that needs to grow and needs attention, otherwise when you need your plans, they won’t be able to help you because they’d reflect contingencies and strategies that represent the company when the plan was first developed – which could be years earlier.

© StoneRoad 2014
A.Alex Fullick has over 17 years experience working in Business Continuity and is the author of numerous books, including “Heads in the Sand” and “BIA: Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program.”

Regards,

A.Alex Fullick, MBCI, CBCP, CBRA, v3ITIL | Director, Stone Road Inc. | 1-416-830-4632 | alex@stone-road.com

“Failure isn’t about falling down, failure is staying down…” – Marillion

Business Continuity Management (BCM) / Disaster Recovery (DR) Document Templates Available for Small and Medium Businesses!!

Not every business can spend thousands and thousands of dollars on expensive software packages to get their BCM / DR programs off the ground – or has the time to get software configured and ready for use.

Having experienced these challenges first hand, StoneRoad developed a cheaper alternative: we developed document templates for Business Impact Analysis (BIA), Business Continuity Plans (BCP) and more.

Visit the StoneRoad site and go to the Shop section to view the various templates available and get your program moving with a low cost alternative to expensive software! Each template provides instructions on what information is needed so that you can build your program with less fuss – and with more results!

Here’s just a sample of our document offerings:

1) Test Scope Charter Document (Word Document)
2) Business Impact Analysis (BIA) (Excel Worksheets)
3) Operating Unit Business Continuity Plan (BCP) Template (Word Document)
4) Emergency Employee Logistics & Pandemic Plan (Word Document)
5) Test Executive Summary (Word Document)

…and more. We’re adding new templates all the time to help you. We even have BCM & DR books and ebooks available.

So download what you need and get started!

Happy planning!

Regards,
The StoneRoad Team

“Reduce Suffering Through Disaster Planning”

© 2014, Stone Road Inc.

BCM & DR Books to Help Build Your Program by A.Alex Fullick, MBCI, CBCP, CBRA, v3ITIL

The message about disasters, disaster planning and business continuity is slowly spreading throughout the globe, as we see more and more organizations beginning to realize the value of preparedness and response activities to protect their operations and instil confidence in those they do business with.

Here at StoneRoad, we’ve seen a spike in people asking us questions and seeking advice on Business Continuity Management (BCM) / Disaster Recovery Programs – and we couldn’t be happier.

So we’d like to remind you that there are some great books by our founder, Alex Fullick, that can help provide great insight into how a good program operates – and how it shouldn’t. The books noted below are available on Amazon.com and at our own shop over at www.stone-road.com.

1) Heads in the Sand: What Stops Corporations From Seeing Business Continuity as a Social Responsibility

2) Business Impact Analysis (BIA): Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program

3) Made Again – Volume 1: Practical Advice for Business Continuity Programs

4) Made Again – Volume 2: Practical Advice for Business Continuity Programs

Keep an eye out for the next book by A.Alex Fullick; “Testing Disaster and Business Continuity Plans” expected to launch in the fall of 2014.

Until then, happy planning!!

Regards,
The StoneRoad Team

© 2014, Stone Road Inc.

BCM / DR Program Templates Available from StoneRoad

Check out our revamped shop at http://www.stone-road.com. We’ve added lots of new document templates to help get your new BCM / DR program off the ground – with more on the way. Each comes with built-in instructions so you don’t need to try and figure it all out on your own. You can even manipulate the templates if you want to so they address your specific need. Our goal is to show you ‘how’ to do things not just tell you ‘what’ you need to do.

Here’s a sample list of what we’ve got so far:
1 – Test-Exercise Project Change Request Template – $9.99
2 – Test-Exercise Scope Statement (Charter) – $29.99
3 – Test-Exercise Executive Summary – $29.99
4 – Operating Unit Business Continuity Plan (BCP) – $79.99
5 – Business Impact Analysis (BIA) (This one along can cost thousands for a software application.) – $79.99

Coming soon:
1 – Employee Logistics Plan – $tbd
2 – BCM/DR Program Policy Template – $tbd
3 – BCM / DR Program Overview (As a bonus, this will include the Policy template) – $tbd

If there’s something specific you’re looking for, send us an email. We’ve got lots in our arsenal and alwasy building new templates so we may just have what you need and just haven’t gotten around to getting it up on the site. We can always build something for you. You can reach us at inquiries@stone-road.com.

StoneRoad: Reducing Corporate Suffering Through Continuity Planning.

Regards,
The StoneRoad Team
StoneRoad 2013 (C)

7 Things That Can Ruin a BCM Program

When financial hardships strike an organization, the Business Continuity program usually takes a hit. In fact, often it will take a hit when times are good so that the corporation can focus on other initiatives; initiatives designed to build upon the good times and keep the company making money. Increase that revenue, YEAH!! When this occurs, resources get reassigned to other projects and the BCM program gets placed on the back burner or it will see resources funnelled away to support other initiatives.
What kind of things do organizations cut from their budgets that can undermine and slowly dismantle a BCM program? Here’s just a short list of some of the actions corporations will take in diverting BCM intended resources.

1. Training – Training is suspended because sending employees on courses to upgrade and keep skills current is deemed as being too costly, especially if travel and accommodation is required. This training also helps to bring new ideas to the organization on how to better their programs but at the same time many executives (or those that approve BCM training) will simply state that the corporation knows what it would do. Thus, additional training isn’t required. Or worse, they send BCM people on courses that have nothing to do with their role.

2. Tests / Exercises – Some BCM tests get cancelled because they take resources away from other initiatives that are deemed a higher priority. Not exercising – and validating – plans and policies can cause issues with recovery procedures when a real disaster occurs because they haven’t been validated and team members have not practiced what they need to do. Also, some believe that if you’ve exercised once before, that’s all you need to do. You did it so you don’t need to do it again. Wrong! The more practice and progressively challenging you make the exercises the more robust the plans and policies become – and the better you’ll be able to respond and recover when disaster strikes.

3. Business Impact Analysis (BIA) – An organization will choose to skip updating the BIA and utilize previous findings assuming that nothing has changed, which is rarely the case. If nothing changed – ever – then there would be no such thing as projects. Projects drive change; from technology to processes. When projects are implemented it will change existing processes, introduce new ones or cancel some others. All this must be captured in the BIA and then carried over to the appropriate plans (i.e. contingency plans, crisis mgmt, technology recovery etc). Remember, ‘change is constant’ and the BIA should be able to capture those changes and then funnel them through to the right areas of the program so it reflects the organization as it is now – not as it once was.

4. BCM Awareness Program – Awareness weeks or sessions, assuming your organization has them, are cancelled to concentrate on other initiatives or because management don’t want to put a ‘scare’ into employees. Most employees I’ve ever worked with have said they would like to know what is expected of them in a disaster; keeping it from them is not a good idea. You’re really harming yourself and the business in the end. Some of the best ideas will come from involving people and keeping them up to date on progress. To put this in perspective, I was told by a Senior Director of a client that they would be making a poster of a specific announcement and hang it up around the office. “Everyone will see it and know of it and we’ll make sure it’s updated as needed”” they said. I guess they didn’t notice that just outside this director’s office were 3 posters; 1 was no longer relevant for the last year and the 2nd poster had a due date on it that was just over 2 years. Hmm, I wonder if those were supposed to be updated too.

5. Maintenance Initiatives – Business Continuity Plans (BCP) or other BCM components don’t get updated, which means that the best any BCM program can do – when not having been maintained – is take the organization back to the state of services and systems at the last time of updating. This is very specific when it comes to Technology Recovery Plans, which if not updated will only bring back systems that could reflect the structure of the company three year prior – assuming maintenance hasn’t been performed for three years. It could end up costing a corporation more money to purchase software and hardware to help bring the recovered systems to more updated levels. This can also increase the time it takes to recovery causing additional delays in getting operations running again. Also, there nothing worse that trying to find someone through call trees or notification applications (or whatever method is used) only to find that they changed numbers and now you can’t find one of the key people you need to help get restoration and recovery efforts started.

6. BCM Support / Investment – Investment in BCM is reduced or halted. This would include future initiatives such as building a new data centre, upgrading the backup tape systems, renewing key components of a Disaster Recovery (DR) vendor contract, or ensuring that a hot-site DR site (which can be internal) is linked to the main data centre to ensure that constant communication is kept between the two sites. Sometimes these initiatives are cut in favour of sticking with what is known for now (i.e. restore from tape), which can be detrimental if it takes 24 hours to restore from tape but certain systems and services need to be available and fully functional by the 8 hour mark. Just like an old car, the older it gets the harder it is to find anyone who has the skills and knowledge to fix the issues and the parts become scarcer and scarcer and the level of reliability on the car slowly begins to slide down the scale.

7. Organizational / IT Change Management: Nothing last forever or rather nothing stays the same forever; change in constant and the organization is constantly changing. If organizational change management (OCM) and IT change management aren’t incorporated or monitored by the BCM/DR team, plans will quickly become obsolete. They’ll only represent the organization as it was before the last change, assuming that while various BCM/DR program components were made, no changes ever occurred (and we know that isn’t true). So keep an eye out for change at all levels because if you don’t, you’re program will quickly fall out of step with the rest of the organization.

When any of these occur, the corporation begins to put itself in danger because what may have been a strong BCM program is now being scaled back and no longer receiving the focus it should have. When the corporation is growing and expanding during the good times, so too should the BCM program, otherwise if the corporation is hit with a disaster situation, it will have a program that only reflects the corporation before it expanded and implemented new initiatives. The corporations BCM program is only as good as the resources and the focus it receives from the top tier levels of the organization and the amount of respect it gets.
StoneRoad 2013 ®

**NOW AVAILABLE**
Purchase books by StoneRoad founder, A.Alex Fullick, MBCI, CBCP, CBRA, ITILv3, at the following locations:
http://www.amazon.com, http://www.stone-road.com/shop & http://www.volumesdirect.com.