BC & DR Plans: Don’t Worry About the Fluff

So when was the last time you found what you wanted in a document without having to dig through pages and pages of information? Do you find that so much of what is in the document doesn’t really need to be there? Is it irrelevant? Is it fluff material just so the volume of the document looks good? In many cases it turns out the document is basically built on the foundation of quantity over quality. That means most of the document – the stuff yo don’t need – is just fluff. Continue reading

BCM & DR: Learn From What Goes Right, As Well As What Goes Wrong

So things didn’t go as well as you planned; either your project implementation didn’t go the way you wanted – without any hiccups – or your organization didn’t respond the way you’d expected them to when the proverbial hit the fan. Well, get used to it. That’s the way things go. You always plan for the worst and hope for the best and having a project management background as well as my BCM/DR background, things don’t always go as planned no matter how hard you try. However, if something does go wrong, it’s a good idea to learn from it. Continue reading

Hello StoneRoad followers,

We’re thrilled to let you know that two books by our founder, A.Alex Fullick are now back in stock on Amazon.  It was enough to know they’ve sold out a couple of times and now we’re happy they are back and available once more…hopefully no more “Temporarily out of stock” messages for awhile.

1) Business Impact Analysis – Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program

2) Testing Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity Plans: How to Plan and Execute Successful Tests

Well done boss!

The StoneRoad Team (c) 2015 Stone Road Inc

BCM & DR: When to Use Software

Often, when an organization initiates its Business Continuity Management (BCM) / Disaster Recovery (DR) program, it a pretty manual process: documents, power points and spreadsheets abound. They look good and they serve a purposes but when the program needs to mature and grow, the manual maintenance and monitoring processes just can’t keep up properly. Suddenly, the person responsible – use is usually only assigned to BCM/DR part time – can’t keep up and things begin to fall apart. It’s time for some help to automate the BCM process to keep it current and maintainable (not just the plans being maintained). Continue reading

Business Impact Analysis (BIA): It’s Never Right the First Time!!

If you’ve been working in the Business Continuity Management (BCM) or Disaster Recovery Planning (DRP) industry for some time you’ve probably been through a Business Impact Analysis (BIA) project; either from the very first initiation or through a maintenance phase. And if you’re honest with yourself, it probably didn’t go as well as you would have liked. Continue reading

What’s the Fuss About Ebola Self Quarantine?

I don’t get the fuss over wanting people to self-quarantine themselves if they’ve been to, come from or passed through any area that has or has the potential to have, Ebola-like cases. What’s the big deal?

I recall when SARS was seemingly running rampant back about 10 years ago (give or take) that one of the instructions was that if you were in contact with – or could have come in contact with – anyone who may have SARS-like symptoms to stay home for a few days to monitor yourself. You even had to call into a hotline and report yourself. Continue reading

Canadian Disaster and Emergency Planning Changes Forever – Today (October 22, 2014)

Something was bound to happen eventually.  Isn’t that what disaster planning all about; prepare for the unplanned events that can throw things in chaos?   After years of never experiencing any sort of terrorist actions, today that changed in Ottawa, Canada.   Terrorists, which is what they attackers are being called at the moment, shot and killed a RCMP officer guarding the Canadian War Memorial and stormed the Parliament building, where Members of Parliament were actually on site.  On Monday – Oct 20/14 – a radical ran down two Canadian soldiers in uniform; one later dying in hospital. Continue reading