BCM / DR: Getting Agreement on the IT DRP Strategy

When you’re trying to determine your IT DRP strategy, you can have many options open to you and you can’t just dismiss them without good reason.  Identify the pros and cons of each solution and document them so you can see which option is best for you – or at least the top 3 solutions that work best for you and have the best bang for your buck.  Continue reading

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BUSINESS CONTINUITY & DISASTER PLANNING BOOKS BY ALEX FULLICK: eBOOKS / KINDLE VERSIONS NOW AVAILABLE!!

We are happy to announce that ebook / Kindle versions of all books by StoneRoad founder A.Alex Fullick, are now available from Amazon.com (and other Global Amazon sites).

Testing Disaster Recovery-COVER_Layout 1 Made Again-COVER:Layout 1 Made Again VOLUME 2-COVER:Layout 1 Heads in the Sand-COVER:Layout 1 Business Impact-COVER_Layout 1

We hope these information sources help you with your Business Continuity / Disaster Recovery Program efforts. Keep your eyes open for more BCM / DR information sources coming from A.Alex Fullick and StoneRoad.

Happy planning!

 

Regards,

The StoneRoad Team.

PS: Congrats boss!  😉

© StoneRoad 2015

A.Alex Fullick has over 18 years’ experience working in Business Continuity and is the author of numerous books, including “Heads in the Sand” and “BIA: Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program.”

 

Business Continuity Management (BCM) / Disaster Recovery (DR) Document Templates Available for Small and Medium Businesses!!

Not every business can spend thousands and thousands of dollars on expensive software packages to get their BCM / DR programs off the ground – or has the time to get software configured and ready for use.

Having experienced these challenges first hand, StoneRoad developed a cheaper alternative: we developed document templates for Business Impact Analysis (BIA), Business Continuity Plans (BCP) and more.

Visit the StoneRoad site and go to the Shop section to view the various templates available and get your program moving with a low cost alternative to expensive software! Each template provides instructions on what information is needed so that you can build your program with less fuss – and with more results!

Here’s just a sample of our document offerings:

1) Test Scope Charter Document (Word Document)
2) Business Impact Analysis (BIA) (Excel Worksheets)
3) Operating Unit Business Continuity Plan (BCP) Template (Word Document)
4) Emergency Employee Logistics & Pandemic Plan (Word Document)
5) Test Executive Summary (Word Document)

…and more. We’re adding new templates all the time to help you. We even have BCM & DR books and ebooks available.

So download what you need and get started!

Happy planning!

Regards,
The StoneRoad Team

“Reduce Suffering Through Disaster Planning”

© 2014, Stone Road Inc.

10 Tips to Remember When You Don’t Have a Disaster Plan…and Disaster Strikes!

(c) Stone Road Inc. 2014 (A.Alex Fullick)

When disaster strikes, keep calm and march on!! Sometimes it’s not always that easy and in a real situation you really do need to carry on; if you don’t, you’re done! Over! Caput! Even with the numerous disasters occurring in the world – some man-made some natural in nature – there are still many organizations that would rather take their chances with fate than invest in a Disaster Response / Emergency Response / Business Continuity Management program. When disaster does strike, these organizations are left empty handed. With no plans or processes in place to respond to the situation they must ‘wing it’ if they’re to continue staying in business – or attempt to stay in business.
So what should organizations consider and focus on if they are caught in a serious situation and they don’t have a BCM/DR program in place? What do they need to do to try to get some level of coordination in response, restoration, recovery and resumption efforts? Below are some tips for how leaders need to view the predicament they find themselves in; a disaster/crisis with no BCM/DR program or plan in place.

1. Don’t Throw in the Towel – Don’t give up! You’ve got to do something even if you don’t have a proven plan in place, so keep going and do what you feel is right. Under no circumstances should you give up, as you really don’t have an alternative unless you really want your organization to fail. As the saying goes, ‘Keep calm and carry on!’

2. Figure it Out Quickly – Don’t waste time debating and getting everyone’s input on what to do. Figure out what your main objectives are then take it from there. The longer you take the less likely you are to remain in business much longer. And even if you do get up and running, because you took so long to do anything, confidence in your organization will vanish.

3. Focus on People – Make people your priority. A little bit of care and compassion can go along way in public and media perceptions and if you make people priority #1, you’ll be forgiven a bit more for not having a plan or program in place.

4. Reconfigure – Time will be of the essence, so don’t bother trying to get things like-for-like; it won’t happen. You have no plan, which may also mean no alternate site, so get what you can and start rebuilding. It may mean patch-working systems and services together and getting people to do activities they don’t normally do but do it anyway to get your operations up and running. You’ve got a clean slate in front of you, so feel free to reconfigure what you need to make things work. A small beat-up car will get you to “location A” just as well as a luxury car, so if you need to reconfigure…do it.

5. Get Rid of Expectations and Assumptions – Don’t bother asking questions and wondering about assumptions; you need to action things immediately and start doing something. If you’ve had a disaster and have no plan in place, then there are no rules, guidelines, directives or assumptions to work around; no boundaries to hold you back. So everything is possible to you and you’ve got to start trying to get your organization back up and running with technology recovery, business continuity and crisis management so that you can begin to service your clients with the services and products you provide. With assumptions, you may be thinking that everything you need is easily available – including people. However, this might not be the case so throw your assumptions out the window because the only assumption that gets proven correct in a disaster is that all your assumptions are wrong.

6. Emotion Over Intellectual Response – If you want to stay in the good graces of people, then speak to them emotionally, not like an automaton full of intellectual platitudes. If you don’t have a plan in place, you’re biggest fight will be with through how you respond to the disaster as perceived by onlookers not how two IT servers are connected to the internet. Speak with an emotional approach and you may find that people will approach you offering help, assistance and with compassionate sympathy.

7. Don’t Blame – Don’t play the blame game right away. You’re in a disaster and the public, employees, partners and the media what to see you dong something and managing the situation; blaming others is seen as a smoke screen in an effort to deflect questions and criticism. But the opposite occurs so don’t bother playing a game you can’t win. When the dust has settled and you’ve performed investigations into the cause, then you might be in a position to start blaming but it shouldn’t be your priority.

8. Request Help – It’s not time to be proud. If you need assistance to get resources then ask for it. Don’t be shy, as trying to hide the fact you need assistance can cause even more problems. Many organizations are willing to help competitors and partners when they have a disaster but many are too afraid to ask for help because asking for assistance is seen as a weakness when in fact, not asking for assistance is a sign of proud arrogance. If you need help, ask and don’t shy away from stating the issues you have, as it a response or helping hand may appear to help resolve some of the problems you’re facing.

9. People Are Resilient – People do not wantonly wish to fail; they want to succeed and responding to a disaster by their employer is going to make them want to work hard and overcome the situation. Their livelihood is at stake and they aren’t about to let that disappear without fighting for it. Many want to be part of restoration and recovery efforts, as it takes them away from the trauma of what has occurred and helps them focus on areas with which they have more control and knowledge – rebuilding servers, loading applications, testing etc. Your organization isn’t the first to experience and disaster and won’t be the last and in the majority of cases, people overcame adversity by sheer hard work and will power – and never giving up. Let the employees do what they know needs doing instead of trying to make it up on the spot, they are aware of what they need to do, as they do it each day – it’s why you employ them.

10. Listen – Listen to those around you – especially those Subject Matter Experts (SME) and End Users that can offer all sorts of advice on how to get something working again. Often, experts are leveraged from external sources and all too often, they are doing things with their own gain in mind, so don’t throw away suggestions from others, as they may have ideas that can be of assistance and those ideas may work better than some other specialists because they often are thinking outside the box. They are also thinking or ensuring they get their jobs back and their employer operational; a different perspective than some vendors and partners who are more worried about the impact upon their bottom line rather than yours.

11. (BONUS) Document Everything: When the disaster is over – or when you’ve got time to start – begin to document everything you’ve done. Every action item and resolution. Every decision. Every communication – the good and the bad. Every participating role required and what they did – and didn’t need to do. Every action asked and required of partners, vendors and suppliers. Every aspect required to assist employees. This will help start you formal BCM/DR program and begin to pull ideas together for plans because as sure as the sun will rise tomorrow, you’ll be building your program immediately. In fact, it’ll probably be the #1 priority of executives and management, assuming you’re organization was able to get through the situation and come out the other side – though probably battered and bruised.

No matter what happens, you have to be doing something. The situation won’t resolve itself by wondering what to do or wondering what ‘might have been’ had you a BCM/DR plan.
When it seems you’re down, get back up and keep playing on – you’re only beaten if you give up, not if the issue continues. It’s said that Edison failed at inventing the light bulb dozens of times but did he give up, no, he played on. Abraham Lincoln give up, despite losing a couple of elections and became President of the United States.

© StoneRoad 2014
By A.Alex Fullick, MBCI, CBCP, CBRA, v3ITIL, author of multiple books on BCM including “BIA: Building the Foundation for a Strong Business Continuity Program” and “Heads in the Sand: What Stops Corporations From Seeing Business Continuity as a Social Responsibility.”

6 Questions: Why an Organization Should Exercise BCM/DR Plans

It’s great to have many continuity plans and strategies to prepare for and respond to, disasters. However, if they aren’t validated they don’t carry any weight and there’s no way of knowing if they would be any good – useful – when a real situation occurs.

BCM practitioners may make the case for exercising plans but sometimes management may not want to provide the resources – physical & financial – available to validate the plans. There are a few questions that can be posed to executive management to possibly allow for the right kind of commitment and support to validate continuity strategies and plans.

1. Will an exercise increase overall BCM awareness within the organization? Well, let’s face it, if you’re exercising BCM plans, of course you’ll be increasing BCM awareness. Depending upon what you’re exercising and how you manage / facilitate the exercise, awareness will be increased but make it a positive experience or else BCM will end up being something negative in participants eyes.

2. Will the exercise identify potential ‘gaps’ in documented BCM plans and procedures? Let’s hope so. Not only do you want to validate what you have documented and discussed with numerous representatives but you also want to find things that may be wrong in the plans – not just what’s right.

3. Is there potential for the exercise to provide ‘learning opportunities’ for participants and the organization in general? If managed correctly and viewed as a positive experience, then employees will learn from the exercises – and from each other. In some cases, they may even be working with people they wouldn’t normally encounter in their daily operations.

4. Will the exercise provide an opportunity to leverage the results for further corporate gain and benefit? They should. If you can show that you’re exercising you plans – and have documented proof of them (Exercise Charters, Executive Summaries, Issue Logs etc) then you can use this information to help respond to RFPs etc and develop a stronger case for a potential client to choose your organization over a competitor. Having a strong BCM program can be used for competitive advantage.

5. Can the exercise provide skills and knowledge transfer between participants? Depending on what is in scope for the exercise, participants may need to seek assistance from other people in the organization for guidance. For instance, if a Single Point of Knowledge (SPOK) isn’t available to rebuild the payroll server because they are busy with other initiatives, they may be able to pass along their knowledge – as best they can – to another resource who will do it for the exercise, this way people are talking to each other and learning from each other. This is a simple example but you get the idea.

6. Can the exercise increase the responsiveness and effectiveness of the organization should a real disaster (or other event) occur? Simply put, the more practice people get the better they become, whether that be BCM or in any other area. Whether you have a large scale situation or a smaller scale incident, you’ll be better prepared if your people – and the processes and plans – are better prepared and knowledgeable. Enough said.

If any answer is ‘yes’ to the above questions, you’re well on your way to securing the support for validating continuity strategies and plans. Exercising only makes a person – or in this case, a program – stronger more robust.
© StoneRoad 2013

**NOW AVAILABLE**
Books by StoneRoad founder, A.Alex Fullick, MBCI, CBCP, CBRA, ITILv3,
Available at http://www.amazon.com, http://www.volumesdirect.com and
http://www.stone-road.com.

BCM / DR Program Templates Available from StoneRoad

Check out our revamped shop at http://www.stone-road.com. We’ve added lots of new document templates to help get your new BCM / DR program off the ground – with more on the way. Each comes with built-in instructions so you don’t need to try and figure it all out on your own. You can even manipulate the templates if you want to so they address your specific need. Our goal is to show you ‘how’ to do things not just tell you ‘what’ you need to do.

Here’s a sample list of what we’ve got so far:
1 – Test-Exercise Project Change Request Template – $9.99
2 – Test-Exercise Scope Statement (Charter) – $29.99
3 – Test-Exercise Executive Summary – $29.99
4 – Operating Unit Business Continuity Plan (BCP) – $79.99
5 – Business Impact Analysis (BIA) (This one along can cost thousands for a software application.) – $79.99

Coming soon:
1 – Employee Logistics Plan – $tbd
2 – BCM/DR Program Policy Template – $tbd
3 – BCM / DR Program Overview (As a bonus, this will include the Policy template) – $tbd

If there’s something specific you’re looking for, send us an email. We’ve got lots in our arsenal and alwasy building new templates so we may just have what you need and just haven’t gotten around to getting it up on the site. We can always build something for you. You can reach us at inquiries@stone-road.com.

StoneRoad: Reducing Corporate Suffering Through Continuity Planning.

Regards,
The StoneRoad Team
StoneRoad 2013 (C)

A.Alex Fullick at the Australian & New Zealand Disaster and Emergency Management Conference (2013)

We’d like to give you a friendly reminder that if you’re attending the Australian & New Zealand Disaster and Emergency Management Conference in Brisbane, Australia (May 28-30, 2013), StoneRoad founder A.Alex Fullick will be presenting the topic “Heads in the Sand: What Stops Corporations from Seeing Business Continuity as a Social Responsibilty” on Wednesday, May 29, 2013. If you’re in the neighbourhood stop by; you’re sure to hear a great presentation.

StoneRoad 2013 (R)